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When spinal injuries become complicated

On Behalf of | Feb 4, 2021 | Personal Injury

There are many causes of spinal injuries. Residents of New Haven County, Connecticut, may face spinal cord injuries as the result of birth, auto accidents, falls, stab wounds and even infections. And for those people, the initial injury may not tell the full story. Spinal injuries can result in challenging complications after the fact.

The basics of spinal injuries

The spinal cord is one of the most important and delicate structures in the body. It relays messages from the brain to the body. Damage to the spinal cord can result in catastrophic injuries. Trauma to the spine can affect people’s ability to move and deprive them of strength.

A number of bones called vertebrae protect the spine. But in the event of trauma, this protection can be compromised. For example, a jagged vertebra can nick or otherwise damage the spinal cord. This is one example of a natural complication that a spinal injury can cause. Incorrect diagnosis or improper handling of an injured patient are also possible causes of complications to spinal injuries.

Classifying spinal injuries

One way that physicians talk about spinal injuries is by denoting how complete they are. An incomplete spinal injury means that the patient retains some control and sensation below the injured portion of the spine. A complete injury refers to one that has robbed the patient of functionality and sensation below the affected site.

Anyone who has suffered complications due to a spinal injury should contact an attorney. In some instances, negligence may lead to spinal injuries. In those cases, it can be possible to seek and receive damages in civil court. Having a dedicated, experienced advocate may make a big difference at trial.

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