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Effectively handling conflict over custody matters

| Sep 9, 2020 | Family Law And Divorce

Getting a divorce can often bring about a sense of relief for Connecticut residents who have been in unhappy relationships for some time. However, if a former couple has children, those individuals will likely still have to remain in contact in order to raise their children as co-parents. Of course, this can mean that conflict can arise, particularly over custody matters.

When faced with custody-related conflict, it can be tempting to lash out at the other parent for not following the rules to a T. It is important to remember that circumstances can change that result in a parent not being able to follow the terms of a parenting plan exactly, so being flexible and having open communication could help lessen the chance of conflict. Checking in regularly and setting common goals could help parents better work together.

If a parent feels that he or she can let the other parent know that a change in schedule is needed, the parents may be able to work through the issue together. If one parent feels as if the other is unapproachable about such matters or that the other parent will make attacking remarks for whatever reason, finding solutions around custody issues may be challenging. Though the parents may not work together perfectly, they can take breaks, avoid discussions when emotions are high and generally find ways to treat each other with respect.

If issues over custody matters continue, it may point to a problem with the custody arrangements overall. If so, Connecticut parents may need to determine whether a modification to their custody order could be warranted. Discussing the matter amongst themselves could allow them to come to new terms, but those terms will need to be approved by the court in order to be legally binding.

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