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Recent hit-and-run highlight dangers to road cyclists

| Jun 10, 2020 | Car Accidents

When someone driving crashes into someone or something else, they have both a moral and a legal obligation to stop. The law in Connecticut requires anyone who causes property damage or injury to another to report the collision to law enforcement. Typically, unless someone requires emergency medical attention, everyone involved in a crash must stay at the scene to give a statement to investigators.

Unfortunately, some people knowingly leave the scene of a crash that they caused in order to try to avoid responsibility for property damage or injuries. They may have an outstanding warrant, a bad driving record, an expired license or lapsed insurance that makes them worry about the consequences of the collision.

Those who get hurt by a hit-and-run driver may have the right to seek justice from the Connecticut court system, by bringing a personal injury claim against the hit-and-run driver. The chances are good that law enforcement will also be looking for someone who has caused an accident but left the scene and will seek criminal charges against that person.

A New Haven cyclist got hurt by someone who drove off from the scene

On Thursday, May 21, 2020, a man biking near the intersection of Grand Avenue and Ferry Street wound up hurt in a hit-and-run accident at around 4:30 in the afternoon. The cyclist involved in this crash was an 80-year-old man who went to the hospital in critical condition.

What makes this particular hit-and-run accident unique is that the driver who hit the cyclist and drove off wasn’t someone in a car or SUV. It was a motorcycle rider, who couldn’t possibly have been unaware of what had happened.

Cyclists often have lasting consequences after vehicle collisions

When compared with an enclosed motor vehicle, a bicycle doesn’t offer the human body very much protection in the event of a collision. As such, a cyclist could suffer severe injuries if they get struck by someone in an enclosed motor vehicle, including spinal cord or brain injuries, as well as severe fractures and dangerous internal bleeding.

Any cyclists, not just those who get hurt because someone drives away from a scene of an accident, may have the right to take legal action against the driver involved in the crash that left them hurt.

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