PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options. We are Open and Fully Operational During the COVID-19 Crisis

How does domestic violence affect child custody?

| Sep 23, 2019 | Family Law And Divorce

When trying to get child custody during a divorce in Connecticut, parents need to take into consideration that the court looks at numerous factors when deciding which parent gets sole custody or if joint custody is best. Many of the factors have to do with what is best for the child, and if one of the parents is under accusation for domestic violence, this is a serious offense that will more than likely affect the parent’s ability to gain custody.

According to FindLaw, if there is a suspicion of violence or abuse in the home, the judge will usually see this as being not in the best interest of the child. Not only is there a threat of physical violence, but it also takes a big emotional toll on the children when they are in an aggressive environment. As a result, a judge will usually not grant custody to a parent who is under suspicion, or as been convicted, of domestic violence. 

Due to the serious consequences a domestic violence charge can have in regard to custody, TG Daily offers some advice on how an accused can defend him- or herself against these charges. Evidence goes a long way and may often cast enough doubt for dropping of the charges. If the accuser says there is physical abuse, taking pictures of the hands of the accused can prove there are no signs of having hit or punched another. If the accuser takes drugs or has an addiction to alcohol, presenting evidence that proves this may help. 

Witnesses are also very helpful, and the more the better. If a neighbor, friend, co-worker or family member saw what happened or is even a good character witness of the accused, this can help substantiate any evidence the defender offers.

 

FindLaw Network