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Failure to properly route school traffic may cause serious injury

With children being dropped off and picked up on school grounds, the chaos that ensues could be potentially dangerous. The schools and their governing bodies must be aware of the dangers and properly plan routes for traffic at these busy times of day to prevent injuries. A recent car accident in Norwich, Connecticut, is an unfortunate example of the potential consequences of poorly organized drop-off sites.

While dropping off her child before school, a woman drove into the wrong drop-off area and then backed up. While backing up the SUV, the parent hit and caused serious injury to a teacher. The teacher had critical injuries and was flown to a Connecticut hospital.

No criminal charges have been filed against the parent, but she or other parties may end up facing a civil lawsuit, depending on the circumstances of this car accident.

In Connecticut, schools report varying methods of getting students to and from different means of transportation each day. Representatives of some schools say that regardless of what safety measures they put into place, some parents do not follow them. One school uses orange traffic cones to route traffic but the principal of the school says that some parents drive around the cones and drop their children off outside the designated areas. One parent of a child at that school says that a lack of enforcement of the regulations is a problem.

Whether or not the parents follow the rules, it is the responsibility of the school and its supervisors to ensure that safe procedures are implemented and that proper measures are in place to enforce the rules. Anyone who has suffered an injury in a car accident as a result of negligence should seek legal advice about obtaining compensation for medical expenses and other damages.

Source: Norwich Bulletin, “RHAM school parking lot accident prompts review,” Ryan Blessing, March 23, 2014

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