PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options. We are Open and Fully Operational During the COVID-19 Crisis

Woman suffers facial injuries in Connecticut dog attack

| Jan 14, 2014 | Animal Bites

Typically, after a dog has seriously bitten a person and police respond to the scene, the animal is quarantined for a period of time. Authorities may then investigate other possible attacks and decide the fate of the dog. The owner of the animal could also be charged with a violation.

That was the case recently after police investigated a dog bite that occurred on Christmas Eve in Southington. The 27-year-old owner of the dog was charged with a violation after the dog reportedly bit another woman’s face and head. The victim had to be taken to a local hospital to be treated for injuries.

According to a report, the victim was visiting the dog owner when the attack occurred. The victim said she was petting the 2-year-old pit bull, and the bite was unprovoked.

In addition to wounds on her face and head, the victim reportedly suffered injuries on her wrist and arms. She was released from the hospital, and the dog was turned over by the owner to local animal control authorities.

In terms of liability, dog owners are responsible for their pets’ behavior. Not properly training and caring for a dog can lead to an irascible, confused or otherwise maladjusted temperament in the animal. Dog bites can leave victims with permanent and disfiguring injuries, as well as high medical bills and lost time from work. Many dog-bite victims also experience negative psychological repercussions after an attack.

Even when a pet owner has clearly mistreated an animal that attacks another person, proving liability for the injuries can be a complex matter. With that in mind, it is a good idea to have a personal injury attorney assess the circumstances of a dog attack to determine the best course of action.

Source: The Record-Journal, “Dog bite leads to infraction in Southington,” Lauren Sievert, Jan. 9, 2014

FindLaw Network